Special Education

https://adayinourshoes.com/common-parent-mistakes-during-the-iep-process/

National Data

According to the U.S. Department of Education Web site Ed Data Express, 12.1 percent of the nation’s K–12 students had disabilities in 2012-13.

The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics at The University of New Hampshire, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, estimates that of the 6,429,431 youth ages 3-21 that received special education services under IDEA in the fall of 2012, 735,890 (or 11.4 percent) were 3-5 years old; 2,631,472 (or 40.9 percent) were 6-11 years old; 2,700,531 (or 42.0 percent) were 12-17 years old, and 361,538 (or 5.6 percent) were 18-21 years old.

The 5,693,441 students ages 6-21 that received special education services under IDEA, Part B, in the fall of 2012 were in the following diagnostic categories: 39.8 percent in specific learning disability, 18.1 percent in speech or language impairment, 7.3 percent in intellectual disabilities, or 6.3 percent in emotional disturbance, or 2.2 percent in multiple disabilities, 1.2 percent in hearing impairments, 0.9 percent in orthopedic impairments, 13.3 percent in other health impairments, 0.4 percent in visual impairments, 7.7 percent in autism, 0.02 percent in deaf-blindness, 0.4 percent in traumatic brain injury, and 2.1 percent in developmental delay.

Of the 5,693,441 youth ages 6-21 that received special education services under IDEA in the fall of 2012, 4,604,585 (or 80.9 percent) spend 40 percent or more of their time in the regular classroom. The District of Columbia had the smallest percentage (68.2 percent), while North Dakota had the largest percentage (92.5 percent).

According to Cornell University’s Employment and Disability Institute, funded by the U.S. Department of Education, in 2012, an estimated 31 percent of non-institutionalized persons aged 21 to 64 years had an educational attainment of some college/associates degree.
http://www.data-first.org/data/how-many-students-with-disabilities-are-in-our-schools/

 

 

 

IDEA was originally enacted by Congress in 1975 to ensure that children with disabilities have the opportunity to receive a free appropriate public education, just like other children.  The law has been revised many times over the years.
http://www.parentcenterhub.org/repository/idea/

RIN: 1810-AB16 Publication ID: Fall 2014
Title: Title I–Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged
Abstract: The Secretary will amend the regulations governing title I, part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended (ESEA), to phase out the authority of States to define modified academic achievement standards and develop alternate assessments based on those modified academic achievement standards in order to satisfy ESEA accountability requirements. These amendments will permit, as a transitional measure, States that meet certain criteria to continue to administer alternate assessments based on modified academic achievement standards and include the results in accountability determinations, subject to limitations on the number of proficient scores that may be counted, for a limited period of time.*****
https://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/eAgendaViewRule?pubId=201410&RIN=1810-AB16

https://exceptionaldelaware.wordpress.com/2014/11/24/us-doe-arne-duncan-drop-the-mother-of-all-bombs-on-states-special-education-rights-kilroysdelaware-ed_in_de-rceaprez-apl_jax-ecpaige-nannyfat-delawarebats-badassteachersa-wsj-nytimes/

The new regulations declare that Secretary Arne Duncan will amend ESEA to “phase out the authority of States to define modified academic achievement standards and develop alternate assessments based on those modified academic achievement standards in order to satisfy ESEA accountability requirements. Theseamendments will permit, as a transitional measure, States that meet certain criteria to continue to administer alternate assessments… for a limited period of time.”

https://whatiscommoncore.wordpress.com/2014/11/24/federal-secretary-of-education-to-phase-out-the-authority-of-states/

The Unexplored Standards: Common Core’s Impact on Special-Needs Education
https://www.hslda.org/docs/news/2015/201502020.asp?slide=CommonCore_SpecialNeeds_2_6_15&utm_campaign&utm_content&utm_medium&utm_source&utm_term

National PTA Toolkit
http://www.pta.org/parents/content.cfm?ItemNumber=3715&navItemNumber=3728
https://adayinourshoes.com/the-extraordinary-burden-of-ieps-on-moms/

http://nancyebailey.com/2014/08/23/do-public-school-students-need-special-ed-anymore/

http://nancyebailey.com/2015/12/04/essa-and-the-dismantling-of-programs-for-students-with-disabilities-andor-gifted-students/

Effective Sept 2015: Feds Remove State Authority Over Special Needs Students and Redefine Who is Special Needs  
https://whatiscommoncore.wordpress.com/2015/08/24/effective-sept-2015-feds-remove-state-authority-over-special-needs-students-and-redefine-who-is-special-needs/

Is Your School District Taking the Right Approach to Special Education?

Programs for children with special needs must be made to fit the child, not the other way around.
http://www.alternet.org/education/your-school-district-taking-right-approach-special-education

“Let’s start with the US SecEd Arne Duncan and the changes to regulations that became effective on 21 September 2015. “In order to make conforming changes to ensure coordinated administration of programs under title I of the ESEA and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the Secretary is also amending the regulations for Part B of the IDEA.”  I wrote tiny bit about it here

What he really meant by that was a fundamental change in how special education will be approached: “[ESEA to] no longer authorize a State to define modified academic achievement standards and develop alternate assessments based on those modified academic achievement standards for eligible students with disabilities.” In other words, unless the student is severely disabled, students will be able to perform the same as their neurotypical peers with  “High standards and high expectations for all students and an accountability system that provides teachers, parents, students, and the public with information about students’ academic progress are essential to ensure that students graduate from high school prepared for college and careers in the 21st century.”
http://elfasd.blogspot.com/2015/11/the-end-of-special-education-part-i.html

For Dyslexic Test-Takers, the New SAT Is Even Worse
https://www.noodle.com/articles/for-dyslexic-test-takers-the-new-sat-is-even-worse172

OSEP Policy Letters (Including OSEP Memos, Dear Colleague Letters, and FAQs)
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/memosdcltrs/index.html

October 23, 2015
Dear Colleague:
Ensuring a high-quality education for children with specific learning disabilities is a critical responsibility for all of us. I write today to focus particularly on the unique educational needs of children with dyslexia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia, which are conditions that could qualify a child as a child with a specific learning disability under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services (OSERS) has received communications from stakeholders, including parents, advocacy groups, and national disability organizations, who believe that State and local educational agencies (SEAs and LEAs) are reluctant to reference or use dyslexia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia in evaluations, eligibility determinations, or in developing the individualized education program (IEP) under the IDEA. The purpose of this letter is to clarify that there is nothing in the IDEA that would prohibit the use of the terms dyslexia, dyscalculia, and dysgraphia in IDEA evaluation, eligibility determinations, or IEP documents…
https://www2.ed.gov/policy/speced/guid/idea/memosdcltrs/guidance-on-dyslexia-10-2015.pdf

 

 

 

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